Contemporary Home Seamlessly Blends KC Inspired Art Into Their Stunning Decor

LOCAL ART ADDS BEAUTIFUL TOUCHES TO URBAN OASIS HOME



 

Calming, peaceful and interesting.” That’s how the owner of a newly built house in southern Leawood describes her home. “When I sold my last house (a hacienda-style manse on acreage), I sold everything. Only a few favorite pieces came with me.”

Her new home and furniture are neutral in hue and modern in attitude. A mix of textures, pastoral views, work from local artists and unexpected touches create interest.

“I tried to support local artists and furniture stores whenever possible,” notes the owner. “The art is local or has local ties, and most of the furniture comes from Seville Home, Groover’s Interiors and Motivo.”

The living room, which seamlessly marries suede and velvet upholstery with chrome surfaces on a hand-knotted Tibetan rug reminiscent of hide, sets the tone for the whole home. The painting above the fireplace, a train engine by Chris Day (an artist the homeowner discovered at the Brookside Art Fair), recalls Kansas City’s railway roots; as do the sounds from nearby train tracks.

Karen Conover, a designer with locally-owned Seville Home, helped bring together a beautiful collection of furnishings that create a truly unique and inviting flow from space to space.

"Knowing my client's passion and priority for wonderful artwork, I wanted to create rooms that serve as galleries for both the interior and exterior visual drama," shares Conover. "The Best result is at once both subtle and absolutely stunning. This home highlights the authentic intersection of art and life and I couldn't be fore delighted to have been a part of it. This is what Seville Home does best."

Next to the living room is the sunroom with views of the neighboring stable. Fabrics are sun-proof to prevent fading. An owl, one of the few treasures brought from the homeowner’s previous house, keeps watch. It was purchased in Santa Fe but is by Branson artist, Tim Cherry. The owl’s smooth surfaces contrast with the nap of the fabric on the couch and the lush thickness of the carpet.

 

OWL SCULPTURE TIM CHERRY

OWL SCULPTURE BY BRANSON ARTIST TIM CHERRY 

 

TRAIN ENGINE PAINTING CHRIS DAY

Train Engine Painting by Chris Day

 

The galley-style kitchen includes a Sub-Zero refrigerator, a Wolf stove and a Viking oven with double doors. The extra-long island allows for many hands. “We’re a family of cooks, and we love being together in the kitchen,” notes the owner. Cabinets are painted in Sherwin Williams’ "Elephant Ear" (SW9168), a subtle neutral that contrasts with the white subway tiles and the rich patina of the wood finishes used throughout the kitchen.

Nearby, a breakfast nook with a custom table perfect for a leisurely meal or a game of cards overlooks a paddock. Again, work by a local artist graces the walls — this time a piece by Jennifer Rivera.

The dining room showcases a one-of-a-kind table. A chamcha slab with live edges nestles atop a brushed chrome base. Chamcha wood is prized for its variable grains and warmth. Balancing the table’s rough grain are the smooth curves of glass pieces by Benton, Kansas, artist Scott Hartley. The red glass brings a pop of color to the home’s neutral palette and the sculpture’s organic feel is enhanced by the movability of its components. Chairs covered in a subtle plaid velvet add another layer of texture.

Also located on the main living area is the master bedroom. Again, the homeowner took pains to create a mélange of textures — the smooth sateen of bedding, the luxurious softness of a velvet headboard, the undulating wood of the dresser and the added interest of faux hide on a white chair. The painting above the bed is “Burning of the Flint Hills” by local artist Carla Craven. Its teals and reds bring color and vibrancy to the room.

 

BURNING OF THE FLINT HILLS CARLA CRAVEN

"BURNING OF THE FLINT HILLS" BY ARTIST CARLA CRAVEN

 

The master bathroom continues the home’s neutral story. Visual interest in the shower comes from glass and stone tiles arranged in a leafy cascade.

The stairway to the lower level is brightened by a painting by local artist, William Rose — an artistic tip of the hat to Kansas City’s jazz history.

When asked about her favorite pieces in the house, the homeowner immediately replied, “The horse painting and the Ping-Pong table.”

The painting was commissioned and includes a poem by the homeowner about the horses in her past, and what the animals meant to her and her family.  Local artist Taj Mattingly created the canvas covered with meaningful words, bold strokes of color, and feeling of movement. Of creating the work, Mattingly notes, “It’s incredibly satisfying to see something so close to a client’s heart come to life on canvas.”

 

HORSE PAINTING TAJ MATTINGLY

HORSE PAINTING BY TAJ MATTINGLY​​

 

Ping Pong Table

Reclaimed ping-pong table

 

The reclaimed Ping-Pong table is the center of the game room, a place where family can gather, play, enjoy a stylish bar (complete with a painting of Buck O’Neil by local artist Anthony High) and access the outdoor living space.

The covered patio includes another item the homeowner couldn’t leave behind. The planter, a large log on iron legs was purchased in Mexico and is a favorite possession. Filled with flowers, the planter enhances the view of grazing horses or young riders practicing their barrel-racing skills.

Calming. Peaceful. Interesting. An urbane oasis. Inspired by Kansas City’s history, geography, and creativity forges a deeply personal home. 

 

ARTIST WEBSITES:
Artbychrisday.net, Timcherry.com, Infinityartglass.com, Cravenstudios.net, Williamroseart.com, Anthonyhigh.com, artistjenniferrivera.com, tajmakesart.com